World Refugee Day

On Saturday, June 20th, in the occasion of the “World Refugee Day”, the Migration Center “Mirekoc”, Koc University will hold a special event “PhotoShow and Documentary Premiere” to critically engage with Turkey, EU and other States, and main actors’ responses to the Syrian refugee crises.

According to the latest inter-country report of the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), issued on May 7th, 2015, the humanitarian crisis has reached an unprecedented scale: 7.6 million people are internally displaced in Syria, while more than 3.9 million are seeking protection in neighboring Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey.

The recent Syrian refugee critical situation presented unprecedented challenges and intensified the debates on migration law in Turkey: What is the status of refugees and asylum seeker? Whose responsibility is it to help them? What rights do they have? And how should the financial responsibility be shared?

The event will feature a Photo Show and a Documentary focusing on the impact of the Syrian crisis on Turkey, as a neighboring country, and Turkey’s response to it, followed by a Q&A discussion.

Photoshow: “N-either Refugees, N-or Guests. Refugees in Camps and in the Urban Space in the Turkish Context” directed by Georgiana Turculet

Documentary Premiere: “We don’t Stay in Camps” directed by Yahya Al-Abdullah and Max Harwood

Registration is free and available by RSVP at giorgi82@gmail.com or by “Attend” at the Facebook event. Refreshments will be provided for all who register.

We look forward to seeing you on June 20th.

Poster & Flyer. World Refugee Day

Special thanks for their contribution to the Photo Show:

Production Emel Tas
Photography Umit Goksel
Photography Georgiana Turculet

Graphic Design Victor Fierascu
Assistant Text Curator Murat Ergin
Translation&Logistics Muazzez Koruturk
Translation&Logistics Muhlise Aydin
Music Adam Dunn
Communications, Photography and Translation to Yahya Al-Abdullah
Creative Advisor Roberto Nistri
Creative Advisor Marco Veronese
Creative Advisor Akin Nalca

INTEGRIM Scientific Thematic Workshops

INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC WORKSHOP

Work Package 1: Identity and Cultural Integration

 


FROM RACE TO CULTURE: ONGOING DEVELOPMENTS IN ETHNIC STUDIES

AND ITS REPERCUSSIONS ON BELONGING AND IDENTITY POLITICS

Monday, 8th June 2015

University of Deusto (Bilbao)

WORKSHOP NOTE AND CALL FOR PAPERS

The Institute of Human Rights of the University of Deusto is pleased to announce the third scientific thematic workshop organized by the working group on “Identity and Cultural Integration” in the framework of the 7FP Training Network “Integration and international migration: pathways and integration policies”.

Looking at the development of migration studies and diversity management of the past decades, one issue that has gained increasing attention is what has been called “methodological ethnicism” or “methodological nationalism”. What researchers define as the “others” who are said to challenge existing bonds of nationhood have gone from “tribal” people and indigenous communities to the migrants, who are the new ethnics. What has remained unchanged, however, is the tension between what is “real” and what is “invented” by the entrepreneurs of ethnicity. The fiction of a mainstream (the receiving society) which is non-ethnic (or a-ethnic) and yet characterized by a singular culture is still largely used as a benchmark for integration policies and discourses, while the main trait emphasized to define group membership for migrants is seen as being rooted in their ethnicity, which is supposed to define their culture. This workshop aims at exploring the tension between the concepts of ethnicity and culture with the aim of questioning how migration and integration studies can constructively contribute to this debate without reinforcing ascribed otherness or reifying cultural essentialism. We are particularly interested in how understandings of belonging and un-belonging have been re-shaped during the various crises currently affecting Europe.

We therefore welcome papers by PhD candidates and early scholars working on these topics. Please send a short abstract (max 300 words) by April 30, 2015 to (Dolores.morondo@deusto.es). The intention is to prepare a special issue of a journal including a selection of the papers presented at the workshop.

The workshop will be opened by two lectures:  “Antisemitism and Islamophobia. Two faces of discrimination?” by Alberto SPEKTOROWSKI (Political Science Department, University of Tel Aviv), and “AMORE : Awareness & Migration: Organizations for bi-national-family Rights Empowerment ” by Laura ODASSO (Marie Curie Fellow, Group for research on Ethnic Relations, Migration and Equality, Université Libre de Bruxelles).

FROM RACE TO CULTURE: ONGOING DEVELOPMENTS IN ETHNIC STUDIES AND ITS REPERCUSSIONS ON BELONGING AND IDENTITY POLITICS

INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC WORKSHOP

Work Package 1: Identity and Cultural Integration

8 June 2015

Human Rights Institute, University of Deusto, Bilbao

WORKSHOP NOTE AND PROGRAMME

Looking at the development of migration studies and diversity management of the past decades, one issue that has gained increasing attention is what has been called “methodological ethnicism” or “methodological nationalism”. What researchers define as the “others” who are said to challenge existing bonds of nationhood has gone from “tribal” people and indigenous communities to the migrants, who have become the new ethnics. What has remained unchanged, however, is the tension between what is “real” and what is “invented” by the entrepreneurs of ethnicity. The fiction of a mainstream (the receiving society) which is non-ethnic (or a-ethnic) and yet characterized by a singular culture is still largely used as a benchmark for integration policies and discourses, while the main trait emphasized to define group membership for migrants is seen as being rooted in their ethnicity, which is supposed to define their culture. This workshop aims at exploring the tension between the concepts of ethnicity and culture with the aim of questioning how migration and integration studies can constructively contribute to this debate without reinforcing ascribed otherness or reifying cultural essentialism. We are particularly interested in how understandings of belonging and un-belonging have been re-shaped during the various crises currently affecting Europe.

Registration

The Workshop is open to professors, lecturers, researchers, PhD candidates and staff from organizations, institutions and public administration with an interest in human rights, diversity management policies, integration policies, public law and political science. Registration is free but required and it includes participants’ lunch.

English is the working language and no translation service is available.

To register, please send an e-mail message to derechos.humanos@deusto.es stating “WORKSHOP” in the subject and containing the following information:

Name and surname(s):

Position and institution of affiliation:

E-mail address:

Mobile phone (optional):

PRELIMINARY PROGRAMME

10:30 – 10:45                   Welcome and Introduction – Eduardo RUIZ VIEYTEZ (University of Deusto)

MORNING SESSION        Chair – Dolores MORONDO TARAMUNDI (University of Deusto)

10:45 – 11:15                  Alberto SPEKTOROWSKI (Political Science Department, University of Tel Aviv)

                                           Antisemitism and Islamophobia. Two faces of discrimination?

11:15 – 11:30                   Discussant: Amandine DESILLE (University of Poitiers and Tel Aviv University)

11:30 – 12:00                Laura ODASSO (Marie Curie Fellow, Awareness & Migration: Organizations for bi-national-family Rights Empowerment, Université Libre de Bruxelles)

Do we need belonging? A plea for mixity

12 :00 – 12 :15                 Discussant : Agnese LACE (Koç University)

12 :15 – 12 :45                 Questions & Debate

13 – 14:30                         Lunch at Deusto Library – CRAI

 

AFTERNOON SESSION    Chair and Discussant – Sonia GASPAR PEREIRA (University of Deusto)

14:30 – 14:50                   Peter OZONYIA (PhD candidate, University College of Dublin)

The Rise of Patriotic Citizenship Orthodoxy in Western Democracies: Implications for Immigrants’ Integration and Social Inclusion

14:50 – 15:10                   Sahizer SAMUK (PhD candidate, University of Lucca)

Is it being low skilled or is it the ethnicity that makes the migrant worker a good or a bad one? Changing perspectives towards migrant workers in the UK

15:10 – 15:25                   Break

15:25 – 15:45                   Claudia PARASCHIVESCU (PhD candidate, University of Leeds)

Stories of (non-)belonging. Romanians in London and Paris

15:45 – 16:05                   Tina MAGAZZINI (PhD candidate, Human Rights Institute – UD)

Conceptual underpinnings of the Romani Italian debate: “a people” v. “a vulnerable minority”

16:05 – 16:25                   Kitti BARACSI (PhD candidate, Pécs University)

Interpretation of Roma youth identities in the discourses on migration

16:25 – 17:20                   Discussion and Debate

17:20 – 18:00                   Closed discussion on Working Package 1 Deliverables with WP1 members

 

INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC WORKSHOP

Work Package 2: Citizenship and Political Participation

 

 

RELIGION AND THE POLITICAL PARTICIPATION AND MOBILIZATION OF INMIGRANT GROUPS. A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE

11 May 2015

CEDEM, University of Liège, Belgium

WORKSHOP NOTE and CALL FOR PAPERS

 

The Centre for Ethnic and Migration Studies (CEDEM) of the University of Liège is pleased to announce the third scientific thematic workshop organized by the working group Citizenship and Political Participation on “Religion and the Political Participation and Mobilization of Inmigrant groups. A transatlantic perspective ”.

According to the last European Agenda for the Integration of third-Country Nationals, migrants should participate fully in all aspects of collective life. The European Commission has recognized that migrants’ participation in the democratic process is important for their integration and that the implementation of integration policies allowing their political participation and their involvement is crucial for integration.

The scientific thematic workshop will examine the political participation of immigrants in an original perspective. Instead of analyzing it through an exclusive ethnic and racial origin lens, we will focus on the role of religion in the political participation and mobilization of immigrant groups in a transatlantic perspective (Europe-North America). The leading question, of the workshop is: what role does religion play in the political participation and mobilization of immigrant groups in European and North American cities? We don’t want to focus on Muslims but consider Catholics, Protestants, and religions as well as non-religious faith such as secularism.

The intention is to prepare a special issue of a journal including a selection of the papers presented at the workshop. Those interested are asked to send a one-page presentation of their paper to Marco Martiniello by February 8th 2015 : mail to: M.Martiniello@ulg.ac.be

The papers should cover in priority one of the following topics possibly in a comparative perspective. However, other topics proposed by the applicants will also be considered.

The topics:

· Electoral behavior of Muslim, Christian, Buddhist, etc. citizens with an immigrant background

· Political mobilization through churches, mosques and religious associations

· Immigrants and organized secularism

· Music, religion and political mobilization of second and third generations

· Immigrants and anti-religious discrimination

· Trans-religious alliances among immigrants

This workshop is open to professors, researchers, MA students, PhD students. The attendance is free but registration is requested before April 15th 2015. Please send an email to Sonia.Gsir@ulg.ac.be

PROGRAMME

09:00 – 09:15 Welcome and introduction – Marco MARTINIELLO (University of Liege)
MORNING SESSION Chair and discussant – Hisham AIDI (Columbia University)
09:15 – 09:45 Muslims and local political engagement in French-speaking Belgium. Hassan BOUSETTA (University of Liege)
09:45 – 10:15 Are Muslim young artists political activists? Marco MARTINIELLO – Fatima
ZIBOUH (University of Liege)
10:15 – 10:45 Identification and political participation of Turks and Moroccans in five
European countries. Maria KRANENDONK (University of Amsterdam)
10:45 -11:00 Debate and discussion
11:00 – 11:15 Coffee break
11:15 – 11:45 Seeking to avoid racialization: the American Muslim constituency in public
policy. Dominique CADINOT (Université Aix-Marseille)
11:45 -12:15 State recognition, legitimacy, and tolerance: Muslims in the West. Serdar
KAYA (Simon Fraser University)
12:15– 12:30 Debate and discussion

12:30 – 13:30 Lunch (room Mahain – level +1)

 

AFTERNOON SESSION Chair and discussant – Paul STATHAM (University of Sussex)
13:30 – 14:00 The political mobilization of African immigrants in Finland through the church
and the mosque. Thaddeus N’DUKWE (University of Jyväskylä)
14:00 – 14:30 Afro-European born-again and the politics: a blind spot? Sarah DEMART
(University of Liege/ University of London)
14:30– 14:45 Debate and discussion
14:45 – 15:15 Formal and informal mechanisms of integration: do different religious
belonging lead to different paths? Lebanon and Georgia as case studies. Abel
POLESE (Tallinn University) and Marcello MOLLICA (University of Pisa)
15:15-15:45 The Role of Religion in Love: the Case of Eastern European-Turkish
Intermarriages Agnese LACE (Koç University)
15:45 – 16:00 Debate and discussion
16:00 – 16:10 Conclusions – Marco MARTINIELLO
16:10– 16:30 Coffee break

2015 STW CEDEM progr fin

 

INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC WORKSHOP

Work Package 3:Labour and Social Integration

 

MIGRANT LABOUR MARKET INTEGRATION.

Thursday June 18th 2015,

University of Sussex, Brighton.

WORKSHOP NOTE and CALL FOR PAPERS

The ways in which migrants become involved in labour markets of destination countries and regions has been a consistent focus of academic enquiry since at least the 1970s. The resulting literature has focused on two related questions: how should migrants’ integration into labour markets be measured and what are the main determinants of that integration.

Both questions highlight the complex, dynamic relationship between labour markets and migration. They relate to broader theoretical concerns such as dual labour markets, social capital and segmented assimilation. They also highlight the often contradictory impulses driving migration policy, where labour market dynamics are a significant motivation for greater openness in migration policy, but also a key area of policing in enforcing migration restrictions. The turn to a wider range of migrant groups in approaches to labour markets, such as refugees or temporary, undocumented, intra-European, or return migrants, brings new empirical focus to these questions. As Europe emerges from economic crisis, this workshop seeks to review the long history of labour market integration and examine recent research on these issues.

This one day workshop is organised under the auspices of the Integrim Network (Integration and International Migration: Pathways and Integration Policies), funded by the EU through FP7. We are particularly keen to receive abstracts presenting new empirical research, applied policy work and comprehensive reviews of the long development of approaches to the labour market integration of migrants.

If you are interested in presenting your research please send an abstract of no more than 250 words to Jill Ahrens (J.A.Ahrens@sussex.ac.uk) before Monday April 27th. Selected presenters will be offered limited travel support and accommodation for the nights of 17th and 19th June

 Final Programme 

Migrant Labour Market Integration

Thursday June 18th 2015, University of Sussex, Brighton, room C333.

9.00 Arrival and coffee

9.20 Welcome and outline of the day: Michael Collyer, University of Sussex, UK

9.30 Session 1: Segmentation and Precarity

1.  Nina Sahraoui, London Metropolitan University, UK.

Migrant care workers’ routes into employment and career prospects in London, Paris and Madrid

2. Iulius-Cezar Macarie, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.

Romanian and Turkish migrant night workers in Spitalfields Market, City of London: Developing a framework based on migrants’ coping strategies to fight precariousness

3. Salah Mahdi, Economist in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Labour policy and migrants’ integration into the Saudi labour market

11.00 Coffee.

11.30 Session 2: Integration and Social Mobility

1. Jill Ahrens, University of Sussex, UK.

Integration, onward migration and wellbeing: Experiences of (im)mobility amongst Nigerians in Europe

2. Yannu Zheng, Olof Ejermo and Lennart Schön, Lund University, Sweden.

How do different types of immigrants in Sweden perform in inventive activity?

3. Raluca Nagy, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium.

The (im)mobility of teaching English in Tokyo

1.00 Lunch

2.15 Keynote Speech: Martin Ruhs, University of Oxford

Is unrestricted immigration compatible with inclusive welfare states?  The (un)sustainability of EU exceptionalism

3.45 coffee

4.15 Session 3: Dynamics of Integration and Questions of Return

1. Katarzyna Kozien, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

‘Short-stayers’ or ‘long-term migrants’? Factors influencing migrants’ decision to return to home country

2. Davide Calenda, European University Institute, Florence, Italy.

Migrant health professionals: Should they stay or should they go?

3. Mateusz Karolak, University of Wrocław, Poland.

Return migrants inclusion and employment: the case of return migration from the UK to Poland

5.45 close

6.00 end

 

INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC WORKSHOP

Work Package 4: Urban Integration, Residential Patterns and Mobility

 

CEG, IGOT, 28th and 29th May, 2015

Social integration policies and equitable cities

Workshop note and call for papers

Cities as the main recipients of international migrants have tended to play a leading role in integration on the ground. The concept of integration, in analytical and policy terms, has been reflexively questioned in the light of increasing urban diversity, new migration patterns and the economic crisis. As cities are transformed through ongoing migration they face new and multiple challenges across sectors from assuring equal access to services, promoting labour market participation, fostering community participation and social cohesion, mitigating urban conflict and promoting urban planning that assures equal right to the city for all citizens. The increasing diversity of city dwellers calls for new ways of conceptualising and measuring integration. This workshop aims to stimulate debate on dominant perspectives on integration in the context of changing realities taking into consideration both policy and migrant perspectives.

This two day workshop will be opened by two lectures by Prof. Rinus Pennix (University of Amsterdam) and Prof. Izhack Schnell (University of Tel Aviv). The first day will close with a roundtable discussion among academics and policymakers. Participants include Dr Maria João Hortas (ESE/CEG-IGOT), representatives of the Social Inclusion Unit, of The Aga Khan Foundation, The Municipal Council of Sintra and Lisbon and the High Commissioner for Migration.

Participants are invited to take part in a study visit of immigrant neighbourhoods in Lisbon on the second day of the workshop.

We welcome abstracts from PhD students and early scholars working on related topics. Please send your abstract to Jennifer McGarrigle (jmcgarrigle@ceg.ul.pt) by 30th April.

                             

INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC WORKSHOP

Social integration policies and equitable cities

Programme

Thursday 28TH May

Location: Luso- American Foundation (FLAD), Rua Sacramento à Lapa, 21
1249-090 Lisboa

 

9.30 -9.45 Welcome

Representative of the Luso American Foundation and Prof. Maria Lucinda Fonseca, Director IGOT, University of Lisbon

MORNING SESSION Chair – Dr. Floris Vermeulen, University of Amsterdam

9.45-10.45 The concept of integration in empirical research of integration processes and in the study of integration policies, specifically local integration policies in Europe.

Prof. Rinus Penninx, University of Amsterdam

Coffee break

11.15-12.15 A model for the analysis of socio-spatial integration versus segregation.

Prof. Izhak Schnell, Tel Aviv University

 

12.15-12.45 EU new targets, indicators and tools to address poverty in the current crisis

Dr. Laura Gómez Urquijo, University of Deusto, Bilbao

Lunch

AFTERNOON SESSION Chair – Franz Buhr, Marie Curie ESR, IGOT-UL

14.00-14.30 Group concentration and collective violence in the city.

Kingsley Madueke, Marie Curie ESR, University of Amsterdam

Discussant: Prof. Izhak Schnell

14.30-15.00 The various meanings of immigrant integration policies and programs in Israeli peripheral towns.

Amandine Desille, Marie Curie ESR, Poitiers University and Tel Aviv University

Discussant: Prof. Rinus Penninx

Coffee break

15.30 – 16.30 Roundtable

Chair – Prof. Lucinda Fonseca

Sandra Almeida, Aga Khan Foundation; Paulo Jorge Vieira, Alto Comissariado para as Migrações e o Programa Escolhas; Dr Maria João Hortas (CEG-IGOT/ UL).

3rd INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC WORKSHOPIntegration and Cities.PROGRAMME[1]

 

Marie Curie Networks Film School

The Center for Policy Studies hosted and helped organize a documentary filmmaking training course for young academics from the INTEGRIM and ChangingEmployment Marie Curie Initial Training Networks.

The MCN Film School was an intensive two-week training program in documentary film-making for Junior Research Fellows of the ChangingEmployment and INTEGRIM Marie Curie Training Networks. It aimed to provide the theoretical grounds for the role of visuality and film in social research; to offer a practical training in documentary film-making; and to supervise the development of visual projects developed by the members of the networks at all stages of production.

It was taught by Vlad Naumescu, professor of visual anthropology and ethnographic methods at the Central European University, and Klara Trencsenyi, freelance director and cinematographer, both authors of the documentary film “Bird’s Way” (http://goo.gl/uXmZxq). During the second week they were supported by the Czech director, writer and editor Šimon Špidla (http://goo.gl/eByRM6).

 

The Migrations network. Call for papers

 

The Migrations network is pleased to invite you to submit papers for its second annual seminar hosted by Migrinter at the University of Poitiers, France on 16 and 17 June 2015.

At this occasion, we will be addressing migration experiences through the speeches of those primarily affected, and through the mechanisms that shape these experiences. These two days will also be partly dedicated to the network life and to foster a space of informal discussion for researchers in migration studies.

Submission deadline: 20 April 2015
Further information can be obtained contacting: scientifiquereseaumig@googlegroups.com and on our network’s Webpage: http://reseaumig.hypotheses.org/

For the participants presenting papers or posters, funding opportunities are available (kindly contact: logistiquereseaumig@googlegroups.com).

“PROTECTING AND INCLUDING ‘NEW’ AND ‘OLD’ MINORITIES: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, SYNERGIES”

INTEGRIM was at the workshop for researchers and practitioners “PROTECTING AND INCLUDING ‘NEW’ AND ‘OLD’ MINORITIES: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, SYNERGIES” organized by Roberta Medda-Windischer (EURAC) in Bolzano/Bozen on February 27, 2015.
Based on their on-going PhD theses, the INTEGRIM research fellows Tina Magazzini and Stefano Piemontese presented a paper titled “Cha(lle)nges in diversity management as a consequence of westward Roma migration in the EU: the case of Spain”.
The authors also drew upon findings from the 2011-2012 research project “Evaluating the Six Years of the Comprehensive Plan for the Roma Population in Catalonia” (EMIGRA and FAGiC) as well as from data collected during the workshop for scholars, policy makers, and NGOs “Bridging the Gap between Policy Making and Social Research. Strengths and challenges of the policies for Gitanos/Roma in Spain” (Barcelona, October 17, 2014) co-organized by Taller ACSA, the EMIGRA Research Group (Autonomous University of Barcelona) and the authors with the financial support of the European Academic Network on Romani Studies.
Thanks to Roberta Medda-Windischer for this opportunity, and also to all participants for the feedback and the outstanding quality of their presentations!

INTEGRIM THIRD CALL NOW OPEN

 

7 New Research Positions within the INTEGRIM Marie Curie Initial Training Network:

INTEGRIM network launches its third and last call for the recruitment of ESR. The Consortium is looking for 7 new ERS researchers who would ideally  be PhD candidates who are already in advanced stages of their doctoral research and the elaboration of their thesis (applicants should have no more than 4 years of full-time research experience since obtaining the degree that entitles them to pursue doctoral studies). The programme offers them the possibility of enjoying a one-year-long research stay at one of the academic institutions of the network, either to improve their analysis or to develop the corresponding field work for their projects.

The online application will be open from February the 2nd until March the 2nd on the project web page (http://www.integrim.eu/application-process/)

This project aims to research on policies and pathways of integration processes concerning migrants and minorities in European societies. The early-stage research positions offered in this call are open to students exploring issues related to migration and the integration of migrants in European societies, whose doctoral research should fit into the following INTEGRIM themes:

1. Identity and cultural integration;

2. Citizenship and political participation;

3. Labour and social integration;

4. Urban integration, residential patterns and mobility.

The ESR positions should ideally be assigned to PhD candidates who are already in more advanced stages of their doctoral research and the elaboration of their thesis (applicants should have no more than 4 years of full-time research experience since obtaining the degree that entitles them to pursue doctoral studies). The programme offers them the possibility of enjoying a one-year-long research stay at one of the academic institutions of the network, either to improve their analysis or to develop the corresponding field work for their projects.

List of vacancies:

INSTITUTION

CALL 2015

DEUSTO            1ESR (12Months)WP1

SCMR-USO        1ESR (12 Months)WP3

CEDEM-ULG      1ESR (12 Months )WP2

IGOT-CEG/UL    1ESR (12 Months )WP4

IMES-UVA           1ESR (12 Months )WP2

MiReKoç KU      1ESR (12 Months )WP1

MIGRINTER-UP   1ESR (12 Months )WP4

For more information: http://www.integrim.eu/vacancies/requirements-for-applicants/

WORKSHOP and CALL FOR PAPERS

INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC WORKSHOP
Work Package 2: Citizenship and Political Participation
11 May 2015
CEDEM, University of Liège, Belgium

The Centre for Ethnic and Migration Studies (CEDEM) of the University of Liège is pleased to announce the third scientific thematic workshop organized by the working group Citizenship and Political Participation on “ Religion and the Political Participation and Mobilization of Inmigrant Groups: a Trasatlantic Perspective”.
According to the last European Agenda for the Integration of third-Country Nationals, migrants should participate fully in all aspects of collective life. The European Commission has recognized that migrants’ participation in the democratic process is important for their integration and that the implementation of integration policies allowing their political participation and their involvement is crucial for integration.
The scientific thematic workshop will examine the political participation of immigrants in an original perspective. Instead of analyzing it through an exclusive ethnic and racial origin lens, we will focus on the role of religion in the political participation and mobilization of immigrant groups in a transatlantic perspective (Europe-North America). The leading question, of the workshop is: what role does religion play in the political participation and mobilization of immigrant groups in European and North American cities? We don’t want to focus on Muslims but consider Catholics, Protestants, and religions as well as non-religious faith such as secularism.
The intention is to prepare a special issue of a journal including a selection of the papers presented at the workshop. Those interested are asked to send a one-page presentation of their paper to Marco Martiniello by February 8th 2015 : mail to: M.Martiniello@ulg.ac.be
The papers should cover in priority one of the following topics possibly in a comparative perspective. However, other topics proposed by the applicants will also be considered.
The topics:

  • · Electoral behavior of Muslim, Christian, Buddhist, etc. citizens with an immigrant background
  • · Political mobilization through churches, mosques and religious associations
  • · Immigrants and organized secularism
  • · Music, religion and political mobilization of second and third generations
  • · Immigrants and anti-religious discrimination
  • · Trans-religious alliances among immigrants

This workshop is open to professors, researchers, MA students, PhD students. The attendance is free but registration is requested before April 15th 2015. Please send an email to Sonia.Gsir@ulg.ac.be

INTEGRIM: Second annual conference held in Budapest

The second Annual Conference of the INTEGRIM Network took place between December 9-12, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. The host and overall organizer of the series events within the Annual Conference was the Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Beneficiary 7 of the INTEGRIM project consortium.

In the framework of the Annual Conference, a one-day large-scale conference was organized on December 11, focusing on the theme “Fissures and Ruptures in European Societies: Masses, Migrants and Minorities.”

http://cps.ceu.edu/events/2014-12-11/fissures-and-ruptures-in-european-societies


The conference addressed empirical and conceptual opportunities and recent explorations in understanding how migration flows, policies, and debates relate, move, reveal or clash with other important discords in society. Competitive, cooperative, transformative, or mutually constitutive relations of marked ruptures in society were explored and explained. The field of migration studies has obvious cross-currents with interdisciplinary scholarship on social inequalities, regimes of citizenship, practices of social exclusion and inclusion, and other key concepts capturing pronounced or disguised social ruptures. Similar types of encounters characterize the field of Romani Studies, whereas the two fields have generated only thin crosscurrents until now.  The conference brought together important scholars with the aim of promoting academic conversations across these two fields of studies and facilitating encounters of these two disjointed scholarly communities.

Keynote lectures

Two individuals were invited to present the keynote lectures of the conference:

1) Adrian Favell, Professor of Sociology at Sciences Po, Paris, prepared a talk on Immigration, integration and mobility: New agendas in migration studies.” Migration studies have exploded in recent decades, without always accumulating much wisdom. Via an overview of the changed landscape of migration and mobilities in Europe since 1990, his presentation discussed how these changes have challenged established paradigms of immigration and citizenship internationally, focusing particularly on the hugely problematic conception in policy and research of “integration”.

2) Catherine Neveu, from the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), L’Ecole des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS, Paris, France), offered the talk Of some of the benefits to be gained from de/recentering citizenship”. The abstract of the talk she shared with the audience is as follows: «Euro-American» assumptions for conceiving citizenship have long remained out of scope, and this does have effects as to the ways citizenship is conceived of and analyzed. There is therefore a need to disclose such implicit framings. If efforts to better grasp contemporary reconfigurations of citizenship require to pay attention to other ways to define and practice it (i.e. among postcolonial minorities or in non-Western sites), they especially require us to adopt new tools and standing points from which to explore citizenship processes, tools and standing points that should avoid to subsume the complexity of citizenship struggles to one or another theoretical “model”. In other words, the much needed destabilizing work in citizenship studies is not just about enriching the picture with views and practices that challenge established meanings; it is also about adopting a political and academic standpoint that reframe citizenship in general, and clearly contextualize it. Here the simultaneous move of recentering and decentering citizenship from its agreed connections and positions proves particularly fruitful.

Talks and presentations

In addition to the keynote speakers, five scholars were invited to present during the Dec 11 INTEGRIM conference:

Prem Kumar Rajaram (Central European University, Budapest, Hungary): Common marginalizations: How austere neoliberalism impacts undocumented migrants and Roma in Europe

The study of the marginalization of undocumented migrants tends to focus on how states govern migrants in order to reinforce its sovereignty. These are important accounts, but the tendency is then to think the marginalization of undocumented migrants as being of a significantly different order to the marginalization of other groups or populations. In this essay Dr Rajaram argues that the contemporary neoliberal relation to politics, economy and the law in Europe cultivates surplus populations, amongst which are undocumented migrants and Roma. Their marginalizations, while each possessing singular features, is related to the marginalization of other groups surplus to neoliberal political economy. It is important to understand this common marginalization as part of an ongoing history of the relation between capital and labor.

Peter Vermeersch (University of Leuven, Belgium): The Roma as a subject of policy: Frames and counterframes

The paper focused on the various ways in which Roma appear as a subject in policy-related documents. In particular, Dr Vermeersch examined how frames emerging from Roma activism – and promoted by various stakeholders in the formation of policies on Roma on the European level – are reflected in EU policy-related documents. European policymakers seek out Roma to direct social assistance their way – but the Roma are also identified as a special group when states impose immigration control or extend security measures on them. While Roma activists have pushed for the Roma’s special position and legal recognition to alleviate the stigma of ‘Gypsy’ and make them a topic of concern in EU policy debates, new counterframes, in particular but not exclusively in the fields of migration and security, have stimulated and objectified the worrisome trend to see the Roma as a social group that is completely separated from national populations and do not share interests with other groups within these national populations.

 

Luicy Pedroza (German Institute for Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, Germany & Central European University,

Budapest, Hungary): The political integration of migrants before and beyond citizenship

The focus of reflections on the formal political integration of migrants in democracies has often fallen onto the citizen/non-citizen divide. Certainly, in the contemporary world it would seem like the best path open for migrants to safeguard  the civil, social, political, economic, cultural rights they enjoy in their countries of residence is to naturalize: that is, to acquire the citizenship (understood as nationality) of the country they live in. Yet, this focus on citizenship-qua-membership in a national community as the only path to formal political participation obscures and deactivates the potentialities of citizenship, which has historically referred to less and more than nationality. Dr Pedroza discussed these potentialities empirically, opening up the concept of citizenship for different meanings that can be activated by migrant residents to demand formal political inclusion beyond nationality.

Huub van Baar (Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany & University of Amsterdam, Netherlands): At the nexus of migration, citizenship and Romani studies: The effects of the EU’s border regime on Europe’s Roma

Migration and border scholars have convincingly argued that the Europeanization and securitization of migration and border policies in Europe have led to practices and techniques of population management that constitute a questionable divide between EU and non-EU groups, as well as between different non-EU populations. Dr van Baar built on this debate, and argued that these securitizing processes and transnational governmentalities have also impacted on the under-researched, ‘intra-EU’ divide regarding irregularized EU citizens, such as Europe’s Muslim and Roma minorities. Consequently, these minoritized, religionized and ethnicized groups have been faced with, for instance, having the adequate exercising of their citizenship – including their right to free movement in the EU – impeded. Dr van Baar focused on the position of the Roma, and on how the post-1989 Europeanization of their minority status – including the institutionalized promises for European citizenship and ‘integration’ – ambiguously relate to the securitization of migration and borders in Europe. He discussed several intra-EU mechanisms and practices of bordering and policing and showed that these securitizing processes affect not only migrating Roma – including those who have fled and asked for asylum – but also many other Roma, particularly the poor and segregated, who are confronted with both forced mobility and forced immobility. Dr van Baar argued that new border practices have increasingly been articulated at sites, such as banlieues, ghettoes, settlements, and poor, ‘colored’ neighborhoods, that are considered as ‘dangers’ to both the state project and the newly devised European project. He reflected on how the continued representation of the Roma as irregular migrants and citizens – particularly through their problematization as ‘rootless nomads’, ‘itinerant criminals’ and ‘undeserving citizens’ – has led to confronting many Roma with forced mobility and to a situation that calls into question the political articulation of freedom of movement in contemporary Europe.

Ricard Zapata-Barrero (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain): Framing the intercultural/multicultural divide

The Multicultural/Intercultural (Mc/Ic) emerging controversy resides in the logic of the necessary requirements to manage a society that recognizes itself as being diverse.  The great multicultural debates of the late 20th century, and even in the early 21st century, followed a script driven by a cultural right-based approach of diversity, centered on such questions as the cultural recognition of rights in the public sphere and how to re-assess equality and cultural rights of non-national citizens coming with different attributions of language, religion, and cultural practices. This focus to diversity has founded the multicultural citizenship studies until the emergence of a new paradigm that is taking shape in this second decade of the 21st century: intercultural citizenship. Interculturalism invades this negative diagnosis of multiculturalism as a lifeguard costume. But it is also true that even if we are in an “intercultural turn”, there is still no political theory founding this turn. It is within this framework that Dr Zapata-Barrero explored the building blocks of a preliminary theory, having Europe as main contextual framework. According to him, to look for the foundation of interculturalism we need to identify some substantial criticisms of multiculturalism that has been deployed this last decade. Dr Zapata-Barrero entered into this foundational frame of discussion taking citizenship as main focus.

Participation of INTEGRIM scholars

The Dec 11 conference was planned, designed and convened by Viola Zentai, Director of the Center for Policy Studies at Central European University. At the end of the day, Paul Statham of the University of Sussex offered the final session reflecting on the themes and currents of the talks and presentations offered. Sonia Gsir (University of Liege, Belgium) and Lucinda Fonseca (University of Lisbon, Portugal) facilitated by chairing the morning and afternoon sessions. Floris Vermuelen (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands), Michael Collyer (University of Sussex, UK) and Dolores Morondo Taramundi (Deusto University, Bilbao, Spain) contributed to the sessions by acting as discussants for the presented talks and papers. The conference greatly benefited from the participation of the senior scholars from the INTEGRIM Network, and was attended by an international audience of approx 100 participants.

 

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WORKSHOP: “Research puzzles and competing approaches to studying Roma migration.”

The second Annual Conference of the INTEGRIM Network took place on December 9-12, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. The host and overall organizer of the series events within the Annual Conference was the Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Beneficiary 7 of the INTEGRIM project consortium.

In the framework of the Annual Conference, a workshop was organized on December 12, focusing on the theme Research puzzles and competing approaches to studying Roma migration.” 

The aim of the workshop was to bring senior and junior scholars together who work on topics related to various aspects of migration, Roma, and Roma migration. Roma migration has been increasingly in the focus of scholarly interest as Roma, generally losers of the transition from state-socialist economies to capitalism, started to migrate from poorer regions and countries to wealthier ones as part of their survival strategies under the new circumstances. In the last two decades the migration process has been varied both with regard to its extent and composition of migrants. For many years, Roma have sought refugee status in Western European countries but were turned away, however, with the opening up of the labor markets and /or borders for new member states, migration intensified and brought about intense political and social rejection in several EU member states. The process raises a number of new questions both in sending and receiving countries concerning migration. The workshop was planned to be genuinely interactive: senior scholars working on Roma migration presented their work while junior scholars (INTEGRIM Early-Stage Researchers) studying other migration related topics acted discussants. The workshop aimed to generate a fruitful debate between senior and junior scholars on the one hand, and link the conceptual, theoretical and empirical experiences of ‘migration research’ and ‘Roma migration research’, on the other.

Workshop conveners and participation of INTEGRIM ESRs

The workshop was planned, designed and convened by Vera Messing and Zsuzsanna Vidra, both Research Fellows of the Center for Policy Studies at Central European University (Budapest, Hungary). The workshop served as a great opportunity for INTEGRIM early-stage researchers to actively take part: Tina Magazzini (University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain) and Stefano Piemontese (Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary) chaired the sessions and offered a comprehensive framework for the workshop, while eight ESRs acted as discussants of the presented papers.

Talks, papers, and discussants

1. Judit Durst, University College London, Department of Anthropology (United Kingdom)
“’
This is getting to be like Canada’: Transnational economic strategies of Hungarian Roma migrating to Canada and then to the UK. A comparative study”

Discussant: Claudia Paraschivescu, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Center for Ethnic and Migration Studies, University of Liege (Belgium)

Discussant: Reinhard Schweitzer, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Sussex Center for Migration Research, University of Sussex (United Kingdom)

2. Stefánia Toma & László Fosztó, Romanian Institute for Research on National Minorities (Cluj, Romania)
MIGROM – Causes or consequences of international migration of Roma – the interplay of economic, religious factors and changes in social networks”

Discussant: Celine Cantat, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, International Migration, Space and Society, University of Poitiers (France)

Discussant: Iulius-Cezar Macarie, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Center for Policy Studies, Central European University (Budapest, Hungary)

3. Alexey Pamporov, Institute for the Study of Societies and Knowledge, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Sofia, Bulgaria)Research tools and methodological issues in the study of Roma migration within the European Union”

Discussant: Jill Ahrens, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Institute of Geography and Regional Planning, University of Lisbon (Portugal)

Discussant: Davide Gnes, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

4.  Giovanni Picker, Institute for Advanced Study, Central European University,(Budapest, Hungary)

“Policy Logic and the Spatial Segregation of Roma in Urban Europe: The Cases of Florence and Cluj-Napoca”

Discussant: Franz Buhr, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Institute of Geography and Regional Planning, University of Lisbon (Portugal)

Discussant: Amandine Desille, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, International Migration, Space and Society, University of Poitiers (France)

 

Journal of the European Roma Rights Center

At the end of the workshop there was a separate session dedicated to the journal published by the European Roma Rights Center, an international public interest law organization based in Budapest, Hungary, working to combat anti-Romani racism and human rights abuse of Roma through strategic litigation, research and policy development, advocacy and human rights education. Marek Szilvási and Kieran O’Reilly spoke about the journal’s latest issue “Going Nowhere?  Western Balkan Roma and EU Visa Liberalisation.”