“PROTECTING AND INCLUDING ‘NEW’ AND ‘OLD’ MINORITIES: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, SYNERGIES”

INTEGRIM was at the workshop for researchers and practitioners “PROTECTING AND INCLUDING ‘NEW’ AND ‘OLD’ MINORITIES: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, SYNERGIES” organized by Roberta Medda-Windischer (EURAC) in Bolzano/Bozen on February 27, 2015.
Based on their on-going PhD theses, the INTEGRIM research fellows Tina Magazzini and Stefano Piemontese presented a paper titled “Cha(lle)nges in diversity management as a consequence of westward Roma migration in the EU: the case of Spain”.
The authors also drew upon findings from the 2011-2012 research project “Evaluating the Six Years of the Comprehensive Plan for the Roma Population in Catalonia” (EMIGRA and FAGiC) as well as from data collected during the workshop for scholars, policy makers, and NGOs “Bridging the Gap between Policy Making and Social Research. Strengths and challenges of the policies for Gitanos/Roma in Spain” (Barcelona, October 17, 2014) co-organized by Taller ACSA, the EMIGRA Research Group (Autonomous University of Barcelona) and the authors with the financial support of the European Academic Network on Romani Studies.
Thanks to Roberta Medda-Windischer for this opportunity, and also to all participants for the feedback and the outstanding quality of their presentations!

INTEGRIM THIRD CALL NOW OPEN

 

7 New Research Positions within the INTEGRIM Marie Curie Initial Training Network:

INTEGRIM network launches its third and last call for the recruitment of ESR. The Consortium is looking for 7 new ERS researchers who would ideally  be PhD candidates who are already in advanced stages of their doctoral research and the elaboration of their thesis (applicants should have no more than 4 years of full-time research experience since obtaining the degree that entitles them to pursue doctoral studies). The programme offers them the possibility of enjoying a one-year-long research stay at one of the academic institutions of the network, either to improve their analysis or to develop the corresponding field work for their projects.

The online application will be open from February the 2nd until March the 2nd on the project web page (http://www.integrim.eu/application-process/)

This project aims to research on policies and pathways of integration processes concerning migrants and minorities in European societies. The early-stage research positions offered in this call are open to students exploring issues related to migration and the integration of migrants in European societies, whose doctoral research should fit into the following INTEGRIM themes:

1. Identity and cultural integration;

2. Citizenship and political participation;

3. Labour and social integration;

4. Urban integration, residential patterns and mobility.

The ESR positions should ideally be assigned to PhD candidates who are already in more advanced stages of their doctoral research and the elaboration of their thesis (applicants should have no more than 4 years of full-time research experience since obtaining the degree that entitles them to pursue doctoral studies). The programme offers them the possibility of enjoying a one-year-long research stay at one of the academic institutions of the network, either to improve their analysis or to develop the corresponding field work for their projects.

List of vacancies:

INSTITUTION

CALL 2015

DEUSTO            1ESR (12Months)WP1

SCMR-USO        1ESR (12 Months)WP3

CEDEM-ULG      1ESR (12 Months )WP2

IGOT-CEG/UL    1ESR (12 Months )WP4

IMES-UVA           1ESR (12 Months )WP2

MiReKoç KU      1ESR (12 Months )WP1

MIGRINTER-UP   1ESR (12 Months )WP4

For more information: http://www.integrim.eu/vacancies/requirements-for-applicants/

INTEGRIM: Second annual conference held in Budapest

The second Annual Conference of the INTEGRIM Network took place between December 9-12, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. The host and overall organizer of the series events within the Annual Conference was the Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Beneficiary 7 of the INTEGRIM project consortium.

In the framework of the Annual Conference, a one-day large-scale conference was organized on December 11, focusing on the theme “Fissures and Ruptures in European Societies: Masses, Migrants and Minorities.”

http://cps.ceu.edu/events/2014-12-11/fissures-and-ruptures-in-european-societies


The conference addressed empirical and conceptual opportunities and recent explorations in understanding how migration flows, policies, and debates relate, move, reveal or clash with other important discords in society. Competitive, cooperative, transformative, or mutually constitutive relations of marked ruptures in society were explored and explained. The field of migration studies has obvious cross-currents with interdisciplinary scholarship on social inequalities, regimes of citizenship, practices of social exclusion and inclusion, and other key concepts capturing pronounced or disguised social ruptures. Similar types of encounters characterize the field of Romani Studies, whereas the two fields have generated only thin crosscurrents until now.  The conference brought together important scholars with the aim of promoting academic conversations across these two fields of studies and facilitating encounters of these two disjointed scholarly communities.

Keynote lectures

Two individuals were invited to present the keynote lectures of the conference:

1) Adrian Favell, Professor of Sociology at Sciences Po, Paris, prepared a talk on Immigration, integration and mobility: New agendas in migration studies.” Migration studies have exploded in recent decades, without always accumulating much wisdom. Via an overview of the changed landscape of migration and mobilities in Europe since 1990, his presentation discussed how these changes have challenged established paradigms of immigration and citizenship internationally, focusing particularly on the hugely problematic conception in policy and research of “integration”.

2) Catherine Neveu, from the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), L’Ecole des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS, Paris, France), offered the talk Of some of the benefits to be gained from de/recentering citizenship”. The abstract of the talk she shared with the audience is as follows: «Euro-American» assumptions for conceiving citizenship have long remained out of scope, and this does have effects as to the ways citizenship is conceived of and analyzed. There is therefore a need to disclose such implicit framings. If efforts to better grasp contemporary reconfigurations of citizenship require to pay attention to other ways to define and practice it (i.e. among postcolonial minorities or in non-Western sites), they especially require us to adopt new tools and standing points from which to explore citizenship processes, tools and standing points that should avoid to subsume the complexity of citizenship struggles to one or another theoretical “model”. In other words, the much needed destabilizing work in citizenship studies is not just about enriching the picture with views and practices that challenge established meanings; it is also about adopting a political and academic standpoint that reframe citizenship in general, and clearly contextualize it. Here the simultaneous move of recentering and decentering citizenship from its agreed connections and positions proves particularly fruitful.

Talks and presentations

In addition to the keynote speakers, five scholars were invited to present during the Dec 11 INTEGRIM conference:

Prem Kumar Rajaram (Central European University, Budapest, Hungary): Common marginalizations: How austere neoliberalism impacts undocumented migrants and Roma in Europe

The study of the marginalization of undocumented migrants tends to focus on how states govern migrants in order to reinforce its sovereignty. These are important accounts, but the tendency is then to think the marginalization of undocumented migrants as being of a significantly different order to the marginalization of other groups or populations. In this essay Dr Rajaram argues that the contemporary neoliberal relation to politics, economy and the law in Europe cultivates surplus populations, amongst which are undocumented migrants and Roma. Their marginalizations, while each possessing singular features, is related to the marginalization of other groups surplus to neoliberal political economy. It is important to understand this common marginalization as part of an ongoing history of the relation between capital and labor.

Peter Vermeersch (University of Leuven, Belgium): The Roma as a subject of policy: Frames and counterframes

The paper focused on the various ways in which Roma appear as a subject in policy-related documents. In particular, Dr Vermeersch examined how frames emerging from Roma activism – and promoted by various stakeholders in the formation of policies on Roma on the European level – are reflected in EU policy-related documents. European policymakers seek out Roma to direct social assistance their way – but the Roma are also identified as a special group when states impose immigration control or extend security measures on them. While Roma activists have pushed for the Roma’s special position and legal recognition to alleviate the stigma of ‘Gypsy’ and make them a topic of concern in EU policy debates, new counterframes, in particular but not exclusively in the fields of migration and security, have stimulated and objectified the worrisome trend to see the Roma as a social group that is completely separated from national populations and do not share interests with other groups within these national populations.

 

Luicy Pedroza (German Institute for Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, Germany & Central European University,

Budapest, Hungary): The political integration of migrants before and beyond citizenship

The focus of reflections on the formal political integration of migrants in democracies has often fallen onto the citizen/non-citizen divide. Certainly, in the contemporary world it would seem like the best path open for migrants to safeguard  the civil, social, political, economic, cultural rights they enjoy in their countries of residence is to naturalize: that is, to acquire the citizenship (understood as nationality) of the country they live in. Yet, this focus on citizenship-qua-membership in a national community as the only path to formal political participation obscures and deactivates the potentialities of citizenship, which has historically referred to less and more than nationality. Dr Pedroza discussed these potentialities empirically, opening up the concept of citizenship for different meanings that can be activated by migrant residents to demand formal political inclusion beyond nationality.

Huub van Baar (Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany & University of Amsterdam, Netherlands): At the nexus of migration, citizenship and Romani studies: The effects of the EU’s border regime on Europe’s Roma

Migration and border scholars have convincingly argued that the Europeanization and securitization of migration and border policies in Europe have led to practices and techniques of population management that constitute a questionable divide between EU and non-EU groups, as well as between different non-EU populations. Dr van Baar built on this debate, and argued that these securitizing processes and transnational governmentalities have also impacted on the under-researched, ‘intra-EU’ divide regarding irregularized EU citizens, such as Europe’s Muslim and Roma minorities. Consequently, these minoritized, religionized and ethnicized groups have been faced with, for instance, having the adequate exercising of their citizenship – including their right to free movement in the EU – impeded. Dr van Baar focused on the position of the Roma, and on how the post-1989 Europeanization of their minority status – including the institutionalized promises for European citizenship and ‘integration’ – ambiguously relate to the securitization of migration and borders in Europe. He discussed several intra-EU mechanisms and practices of bordering and policing and showed that these securitizing processes affect not only migrating Roma – including those who have fled and asked for asylum – but also many other Roma, particularly the poor and segregated, who are confronted with both forced mobility and forced immobility. Dr van Baar argued that new border practices have increasingly been articulated at sites, such as banlieues, ghettoes, settlements, and poor, ‘colored’ neighborhoods, that are considered as ‘dangers’ to both the state project and the newly devised European project. He reflected on how the continued representation of the Roma as irregular migrants and citizens – particularly through their problematization as ‘rootless nomads’, ‘itinerant criminals’ and ‘undeserving citizens’ – has led to confronting many Roma with forced mobility and to a situation that calls into question the political articulation of freedom of movement in contemporary Europe.

Ricard Zapata-Barrero (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain): Framing the intercultural/multicultural divide

The Multicultural/Intercultural (Mc/Ic) emerging controversy resides in the logic of the necessary requirements to manage a society that recognizes itself as being diverse.  The great multicultural debates of the late 20th century, and even in the early 21st century, followed a script driven by a cultural right-based approach of diversity, centered on such questions as the cultural recognition of rights in the public sphere and how to re-assess equality and cultural rights of non-national citizens coming with different attributions of language, religion, and cultural practices. This focus to diversity has founded the multicultural citizenship studies until the emergence of a new paradigm that is taking shape in this second decade of the 21st century: intercultural citizenship. Interculturalism invades this negative diagnosis of multiculturalism as a lifeguard costume. But it is also true that even if we are in an “intercultural turn”, there is still no political theory founding this turn. It is within this framework that Dr Zapata-Barrero explored the building blocks of a preliminary theory, having Europe as main contextual framework. According to him, to look for the foundation of interculturalism we need to identify some substantial criticisms of multiculturalism that has been deployed this last decade. Dr Zapata-Barrero entered into this foundational frame of discussion taking citizenship as main focus.

Participation of INTEGRIM scholars

The Dec 11 conference was planned, designed and convened by Viola Zentai, Director of the Center for Policy Studies at Central European University. At the end of the day, Paul Statham of the University of Sussex offered the final session reflecting on the themes and currents of the talks and presentations offered. Sonia Gsir (University of Liege, Belgium) and Lucinda Fonseca (University of Lisbon, Portugal) facilitated by chairing the morning and afternoon sessions. Floris Vermuelen (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands), Michael Collyer (University of Sussex, UK) and Dolores Morondo Taramundi (Deusto University, Bilbao, Spain) contributed to the sessions by acting as discussants for the presented talks and papers. The conference greatly benefited from the participation of the senior scholars from the INTEGRIM Network, and was attended by an international audience of approx 100 participants.

 

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.826371190738305.1073741831.795569123818512&type=1

WORKSHOP: “Research puzzles and competing approaches to studying Roma migration.”

The second Annual Conference of the INTEGRIM Network took place on December 9-12, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. The host and overall organizer of the series events within the Annual Conference was the Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Beneficiary 7 of the INTEGRIM project consortium.

In the framework of the Annual Conference, a workshop was organized on December 12, focusing on the theme Research puzzles and competing approaches to studying Roma migration.” 

The aim of the workshop was to bring senior and junior scholars together who work on topics related to various aspects of migration, Roma, and Roma migration. Roma migration has been increasingly in the focus of scholarly interest as Roma, generally losers of the transition from state-socialist economies to capitalism, started to migrate from poorer regions and countries to wealthier ones as part of their survival strategies under the new circumstances. In the last two decades the migration process has been varied both with regard to its extent and composition of migrants. For many years, Roma have sought refugee status in Western European countries but were turned away, however, with the opening up of the labor markets and /or borders for new member states, migration intensified and brought about intense political and social rejection in several EU member states. The process raises a number of new questions both in sending and receiving countries concerning migration. The workshop was planned to be genuinely interactive: senior scholars working on Roma migration presented their work while junior scholars (INTEGRIM Early-Stage Researchers) studying other migration related topics acted discussants. The workshop aimed to generate a fruitful debate between senior and junior scholars on the one hand, and link the conceptual, theoretical and empirical experiences of ‘migration research’ and ‘Roma migration research’, on the other.

Workshop conveners and participation of INTEGRIM ESRs

The workshop was planned, designed and convened by Vera Messing and Zsuzsanna Vidra, both Research Fellows of the Center for Policy Studies at Central European University (Budapest, Hungary). The workshop served as a great opportunity for INTEGRIM early-stage researchers to actively take part: Tina Magazzini (University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain) and Stefano Piemontese (Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary) chaired the sessions and offered a comprehensive framework for the workshop, while eight ESRs acted as discussants of the presented papers.

Talks, papers, and discussants

1. Judit Durst, University College London, Department of Anthropology (United Kingdom)
“’
This is getting to be like Canada’: Transnational economic strategies of Hungarian Roma migrating to Canada and then to the UK. A comparative study”

Discussant: Claudia Paraschivescu, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Center for Ethnic and Migration Studies, University of Liege (Belgium)

Discussant: Reinhard Schweitzer, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Sussex Center for Migration Research, University of Sussex (United Kingdom)

2. Stefánia Toma & László Fosztó, Romanian Institute for Research on National Minorities (Cluj, Romania)
MIGROM – Causes or consequences of international migration of Roma – the interplay of economic, religious factors and changes in social networks”

Discussant: Celine Cantat, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, International Migration, Space and Society, University of Poitiers (France)

Discussant: Iulius-Cezar Macarie, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Center for Policy Studies, Central European University (Budapest, Hungary)

3. Alexey Pamporov, Institute for the Study of Societies and Knowledge, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Sofia, Bulgaria)Research tools and methodological issues in the study of Roma migration within the European Union”

Discussant: Jill Ahrens, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Institute of Geography and Regional Planning, University of Lisbon (Portugal)

Discussant: Davide Gnes, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

4.  Giovanni Picker, Institute for Advanced Study, Central European University,(Budapest, Hungary)

“Policy Logic and the Spatial Segregation of Roma in Urban Europe: The Cases of Florence and Cluj-Napoca”

Discussant: Franz Buhr, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, Institute of Geography and Regional Planning, University of Lisbon (Portugal)

Discussant: Amandine Desille, INTEGRIM early-stage researcher, International Migration, Space and Society, University of Poitiers (France)

 

Journal of the European Roma Rights Center

At the end of the workshop there was a separate session dedicated to the journal published by the European Roma Rights Center, an international public interest law organization based in Budapest, Hungary, working to combat anti-Romani racism and human rights abuse of Roma through strategic litigation, research and policy development, advocacy and human rights education. Marek Szilvási and Kieran O’Reilly spoke about the journal’s latest issue “Going Nowhere?  Western Balkan Roma and EU Visa Liberalisation.”

INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS. SECOND EDITION

The second Annual Conference of the INTEGRIM Network took place on December 9-12, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. The host and overall organizer of the series events within the Annual Conference was the Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Beneficiary 7 of the INTEGRIM project consortium.

In the framework of the Annual Conference, each INTEGRIM Work Package held parallel Scientific Meetings on December 9.

WP1 Scientific Meeting in Budapest at Annual Conference

The coordinators of Work Package 1 entitled “Identity and Cultural Integration” of the INTEGRIM Project has organised the scientific meeting on 9 December 2014 at the Central European University compound. Representatives of Koç University and University of Deusto, two keynote speakers and early stage researchers of WP1 have attended to the meeting. The session is moderated by Ilke Sanlier Yuksel (Koç University), Eduardo J. Ruiz Vieytez and Dolores Morondo Taramundi (Deusto University).

This half day meeting has started with Dr. Saime Ozcurumez’s (Bilkent University) talk on theoretical and conceptual framework of cultural integration entitled “An Overview of Migration and Integration Nexus”. S

econd talk was given by Ms. Meral Acikgoz (IOM-Turkey) on how integration issues are perceived and operationalised by IOM. After the keynote speeches, ESRs presented their papers that reflect on an aspect of their research.

Tina Magazzini presented her findings from the field research on Roma integration in a comparative case of Italy and Spain.

Claudia Paraschivescu gave her talk on the comparative cases of Romanians who live in London and Paris in order to understand the notion of transnationalism as the negotiation of belonging.

Sahizer Samuk presented her research on temporary labour migration policies in UK and Canada and discussed the possibility to coin the term “temporary integration”. The papers were discussed by all participants of the meeting, without assigning a specific discussant for each. At the end of the meeting, prospects of possible scientific publications as a part of dissemination plan has been discussed. KU representative has brought the possibility to publish a specific volume on cultural integration by a reputable publisher and suggested to approach to a publisher within the next months. UDeusto representative also highlighted the importance of collective publishing work. It is decided to continue to discuss this issue via e-mail exchanges. The meeting has been closed with the decision of bringing a proposal and initiation till the next scientific workshop to be held in spring.

WP2 Scientific Meeting in Budapest at Annual Conference

In the meeting we had six fellows participating (3 long-term and 3 short-term). Each of them did short presentations of maximum 10 minutes followed by 20 minutes discussion. Long-term fellows acted as discussants for the papers of the short-term fellows and vice versa (discussants spoke for max. 5 minutes). Shannon Demery presented a paper entitled FINDING THE WAY HOME: METHODOLOGY AND FIELDWORK REFLECTIONS in which she provided overview of her project and field work conducted in the last 12 months in Belgium. Discussion focused mainly on methodological issues.

Davide Gnes presented a paper entitled ORGANIZATIONAL LEGITIMACY BEYOND ETHNICITY? THE CASE OF KIWA AND THE STRUGGLE FOR THE RIGHTS OF IMMIGRANT LOW-WAGE WORKERS. In this paper he discussed the situation in Los Angeles in terms of immigrant rights movement. The discussion focused primarily on how this movement can be understood.

Agnese Lace presented a paper entitled DUAL CITIZENSHIP AS A TOOL FOR DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT IN THE ERA OF TRANSNATIONALISM. In her paper she explained main purpose of her PhD project. Discussion focused on framework and data used in the project.

Stefano Piemontese presented paper entitled LEAVING ‘ROMA’ BEHIND. NOTES ABOUT MOBILITY, HOUSING, AND EDUCATION. In this paper he discussed literature on Roma and education. Discussion focused on how he wants to use insights of literature for his project.

Celine Cantat presented a paper entitled CONTESTING EUROPEANISM: MIGRANT SOLIDARITY ACTIVISM IN THE EUROPEAN UNION. In this paper she talked about final results of her PhD project. Discussion focused on how we should interpret these results.

Georgiana Turculet presented a paper entitled ‘Immigration and Democratic States’ Borders’. In this paper a theoretical framework was discussed how to assess immigration in democratic states.

WP3 Scientific Meeting in Budapest at Annual Conference

The Scientific Meeting of WP3 was used as an occasion for discussing some outstanding issues that the ESRs are thinking of, developing, or grappling with in their work.  The fellows were asked to circulate the titles and short descriptions of their presentations beforehand, and then for the meeting to prepare a presentation on some aspects, substantive components, or segments of their work. This latter could be a conference paper draft, a proto-chapter of their thesis, or any other meaningful academic product that articulates the issue they wished to discuss in this smaller circle. INTEGRIM senior scholars took on the role of discussants and first they were asked to provide reflections and comments, and then all participants had the opportunity to engage in a discussion.

Bjarney Friđriksdóttir (short-term ESR, Deusto University, Bilbao, Spain)

EU Law on Labour Migration and the principle of non-discrimination

Discussant: Mike Collyer, Sussex University

Summary: In the presentation I will introduce the section of the theoretical framework of the study which focuses on the principle of non-discrimination. Therein, non-discrimination will be presented and discussed firstly as a fundamental principle of human rights, secondly as a general, fundamental principle of Community Law and thirdly in relation to the goal of the European Union to grant third country nationals lawfully residing in a Member State near equal rights to citizens.

Discussion points:

•           To what extent is the principle of non-discrimination, as a fundamental human rights principle and as a general, fundamental principle of Community Law applicable to EU Law on labour migration?

•           Are the differences in rights granted to labour migrants by the Single Permit Directive and the Blue Card Directive compatible the goal  to grant TCNs who reside legally within the EU near equal rights to citizens and to achieve social cohesion?

Reinhard Schweitzer (long-term ESR, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK)

The local, everyday politics and negotiations of migrant irregularity

Discussant: Sonia Pereira, Deusto University

Summary: Irregular migrants are excluded from formal political participation and face significant barriers to most other kinds of political engagement or activism. At the same time, it is precisely their irregular status – by placing them outside of the law but at the very centre of (immigration) politics – that, arguably, renders many of their everyday activities, interactions and decisions inherently political. Not only the ‘illegal’ selling of their labour, but also their engagement within local communities, going to school or shopping, seeing doctors or claiming access to other services formally denied to them, thus becomes a form of political expression and contestation. At the other end of these relations, the same can be said about the actions taken by a wide range of societal actors who in their private or professional role as, for example, friends and colleagues, teachers, health and social workers, lawyers or NGO staff come in contact with irregular migrants by either responding to their needs or simply accepting them as clients or part of the local community.

In the context of the UK government’s approach – to create a ‘hostile environment’ for irregular migrants – this seems particularly relevant. What puzzles me, however, is that most of the people that I have spoken to since the beginning of my fieldwork in London, do not perceive their dealings with migrants in irregular situations as political acts, but rather as ‘part of their job’ or demanded by their professional ethics or humanitarian ethos. This seems to make the conceptualization of their acts as part of the ‘politics of migrant irregularity’ less straight forward.

Jill Ahrens (short-term ESR, University of Lisbon, Portugal)

Onwards and Upwards? Intra-European onward migration and social mobility across segmented labour markets

Discussant: Viola Zentai, Central European University

Summary: International onward migration requires migrants to negotiate their entry to multiple nation states, as well as their social status across various locations. This paper explores the role that class plays in migration trajectories – with regard to the selection of destinations, the experiences of settlement and decisions to onward migrate. It argues that the resources migrants have at their disposal influence their migration process and its outcomes, in turn migrants’ capacity to mobilize resources is determined by their socio-economic background or class. The empirical data consists of in-depth interviews with Nigerians in Germany, the UK and Spain and ethnographic fieldwork in the three countries. By analysing the narratives through the lenses of ‘mobilisation of resources’ and ‘preparedness’ (Cassarino 2004), it is possible to account for the variation in the experiences of onward migrants

Iulius-Cezar Macarie (long-term ESR, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary)

Developing a framework based on migrants’ coping strategies to fight precariousness

Discussant: Pedro J. Oiarzabal, Deusto University

Summary: In Standing’s terms, the precariat is the new dangerous class born and produced in the neo-liberal capitalist era1. This people are expected to be ever more adaptable in a flexible market, which is enough to have anyone prone to the four As – alienated, anomic, anxious and angry. Migrant or not, precariousness seems to affect all of us, academics, artists, musicians and in most destructive ways, the people found at the low end of the labour markets. And in Standing’s view the latter is growing in dangerous numbers, and is at the disposal of the global market forces controlled from the centres of corporate powers in global cities. We see here how Standing is portraying the precariat as ‘the victim’ (of globalisation), a commodity to be bought and sold, subject to market forces, with prices set by demand and supply, without effective ‘agency’ (a capacity to resist)2. In part, this description is true, but I am not convinced this is the whole picture. This could be explained by the fact that migrants’ strategies to cope and survive precarity have also diversified.

Whether we prefer to highlight promising or worrisome developments of the growing precariat and their coping strategies, there is little doubt that the spectrum of precarity and precariousness amongst the working people has diversified since the neo-liberal capitalism aggressive advancement. Therefore, in the context of an expanding flexible world market where corporate powers can compete fearlessly against each other as a result of an ever increasing precariat, it would be useful and even necessary for my research to discuss the following during our seminar:

What strategies are developed by migrant night workers in the global cities’ night time economy to compete against or show solidarity to others, in order to survive their precarious conditions at the low end of the job market, and outside of capitalism? In other words, in what sense the strategies developed by migrant night workers provide a framework for understanding their survival/coping against the precariousness of their livelihoods?

WP4  Scientific Meeting in Budapest at Annual Conference

The WP4 scientific meeting held on December 9, 2014 during the 2nd Annual INTEGRIM Conference at Central European University (Budapest) was organised by Cédric Audebert (Migrinter/University of Poitiers). The theme of urban integration, residential patterns and mobility was the scientific nexus around which Franz Buhr (U. of Lisbon), Amandine Desille (U. of Poitiers) and Kingsley Madueke (U. of Amsterdam) presented their research projects. Three representatives of the presenters’ institutions – Cédric Audebert, Walter Nicols, Jennifer Mc Garrigle Montezuma de Carvalho and Lucinda Fonseca – as well as the ESR were invited to discuss the presentations and share their feedback on the theoretical and conceptual issues identified by the three presenters.

The issue of urban integration, residential patterns and mobility was dealt with through three lenses: migrant spatial integration as a skilled practice; the interpretation of national absorption policies by local city governments; and the relation between residential segregation and ethnic relations in urban environments.

Franz Buhr’s presentation suggested that, in the migrant’s process of “becoming local”, his/her spatial integration was a skilled practice where familiarity, rather than a ‘natural’ attribute of spatial relations, was constructed and lived as an ongoing practice. Departing from the ways individual migrants live and embody the process of urban apprenticeship encourages us to catch up with many recent claims for taking seriously the role of immigrants as true actors in the production of the city. When migrants are seen as knowledgeable and skilled inhabitants not only we do more justice to the complex engagements people undertake with space, but also help disincarcerate migration and integration studies from the fixity of traditional categories.

Amandine Desille’s presentation on “Aliyah and absorption policies: Local interpretations in Israeli economically depressed towns” pointed out the hiatus that has existed between the official discourse of an Israeli immigration policy opened to any Jew and the de facto professional, socio-economic and cultural disqualification of many immigrants grounded on the neo-liberal premises of absorption policies at the local level. The presentation singled out the fact that Aliyah local policies started to be used as tool to control/select immigration in the cities, and that even more in cities where tensions between communities existed.

Kingsley Madueke’s presentation on “Residential segregation and violent extremism in urban environments” aimed at drawing possible lessons from the experience of deteriorating interethnic relations in Jos, Nigeria. As violence intensified, people fled to neighbourhoods where their co-ethnics predominated, which led to higher levels of residential segregation throughout the city. From a theoretical reflection that identified three types of segregated neighbourhoods (enclaves, splits, buffer zones), the presentation hypothesised that the type of neighbourhood determined how violence was produced.

The discussion that followed each presentation focused on the feasibility of the research projects, and on the relevance of the theoretical and conceptual frameworks on which they were grounded. A discussion was also led on the short- and mid-term dissemination and publication strategies ESR could consider for their research.

NEW CALL COMING SOON

7 New Research Positions will be offered in early spring within the INTEGRIM Marie Curie Initial Training Network:

Next month INTEGRIM network will launch its third and last call for the recruitment of ESR. The Consortium is looking for 7 new ERS researchers who would ideally  be PhD candidates who are already in advanced stages of their doctoral research and the elaboration of their thesis (applicants should have no more than 4 years of full-time research experience since obtaining the degree that entitles them to pursue doctoral studies). The programme offers them the possibility of enjoying a one-year-long research stay at one of the academic institutions of the network, either to improve their analysis or to develop the corresponding field work for their projects.

The online application will be open from February the 2nd until March the 2nd on the project web page (http://www.integrim.eu/application-process/)

This project aims to research on policies and pathways of integration processes concerning migrants and minorities in European societies. The early-stage research positions offered in this call are open to students exploring issues related to migration and the integration of migrants in European societies, whose doctoral research should fit into the following INTEGRIM themes:

1. Identity and cultural integration;

2. Citizenship and political participation;

3. Labour and social integration;

4. Urban integration, residential patterns and mobility.

The ESR positions should ideally be assigned to PhD candidates who are already in more advanced stages of their doctoral research and the elaboration of their thesis (applicants should have no more than 4 years of full-time research experience since obtaining the degree that entitles them to pursue doctoral studies). The programme offers them the possibility of enjoying a one-year-long research stay at one of the academic institutions of the network, either to improve their analysis or to develop the corresponding field work for their projects.

List of vacancies:

INSTITUTION

CALL 2015

DEUSTO            1ESR (12Months)WP1

SCMR-USO        1ESR (12 Months)WP3

CEDEM-ULG      1ESR (12 Months )WP2

IGOT-CEG/UL    1ESR (12 Months )WP4

IMES-UVA           1ESR (12 Months )WP2

MiReKoç KU      1ESR (12 Months )WP1

MIGRINTER-UP   1ESR (12 Months )WP4

For more information: http://www.integrim.eu/vacancies/requirements-for-applicants/

Report of Integrim workshop: Urban Migrants/Migrant Urbanisms: North and South. University of Sussex June 9th 2014.

This full day workshop focused on different aspects of migration and urbanisation, different ways of studying migration to urban areas and different theoretical aspects of the relationship between migration theory and urban theory. The day was well attended throughout with 20-30 people in the audience and excellent discussions. The day was organised in four sessions of an hour to an hour and a half each.

In the first session, Benjamin Dix of the University of Sussex presented two recent oral history projects, tracing migration histories of refugees from Sri Lanka in London and Somali migrants in six other European cities. The outcome of these projects is a graphic novel, relating the stories of the migrants interviewed. The original presentation is more than just an attractive way of presenting stories – they provide an original methodology, in the which testimonies are collected, expressed in graphic novel format and then discussed with the individual migrants during subsequent interviews in order to reconfirm their accounts and highlight aspects of their stories.

The second section was devoted to updates on research by core Integrim researchers. The two current fellows in Workpackage three are focused on integration at the city level – this provoked the theme of the workshop. Reinhard Schweitzer presented his final plans for research on the city level integration of undocumented migrants in London and Barcelona. Unfortunately, the other fellow, Julius Cezar Macarie, was unable to attend due to illness. Michael Collyer then presented ongoing research funded under the joint Dfid/IDRC ‘Safe and Inclusive Cities’ programme, looking at forced resettlement in Colombo and Jaffna. The main quantitative research stage has just been completed and initial data demonstrates how dissatisfied most people are with their new housing arrangements.

Immediately after lunch, Tiziana Caponio of the University of Turin presented a long standing research project on processes of integration in Italian cities. She questioned the nature of policy convergence, arguing that the convergence argument emerges from a set of quite well established case studies, such as Copenhagen or Amsterdam, but does not necessarily fit all investigation of integration policy at local level.

The final session of the day was a discussion of a recently funded project entitled ‘Migrants on the Margins’ which explores migration to six cities in Africa and Asia. A roundtable of researchers on the project (Andrew Baldwin from the University of Durham; Maryann Bylander and Laura Hammond from SOAS and JoAnn McGregor from Sussex). The themes discussed included the distinctions between the standard focus of the cities and migration literature on Europe and North America and operating in countries which are much less happy about the spatial distribution of population. It was much more likely for national and city governments in Africa and Asia to try to restrict or reduce migration to large cities than is the case in Europe and North America, reflecting a more common characterisation of migration as a problem.

Overall, discussions and questions explored

Film screening and discussion on the topic of ‘Budapestian Rhythms and Colors’

INTEGRIM research fellow, Iulius-Cezar Macarie, organizes a film screening and discussion on the topic of ‘Budapestian Rhythms and Colors’ in the framework of his Marie-Curie research project. The screening of Kolorlokál took place on June 12 – this documentary offers snapshots of the city’s night economy, the transition from night to day, and the awakening of the city and its inhabitants. The screening was followed by a discussion on utilizing visual methods in ethnographic research, moderated by CEU professor Vlad Naumescu. More: http://bit.ly/1lI2iLe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N37kB4u3fV8

2014_June_12_Nightlaboratory_screening & talk_flyer_organizer Macarie

MULTICULTURAL POLICIES IN FEDERATED ENTITIES INTEGRIM SCIENTIFIC THEMATIC WORKSHOP Work Package 2: Citizenship and Political Participation

Wednesday 11 June 2014

CEDEM, University of Liège

In the context of the 7FP Training Network “Integration and international migration: pathways and integration policies”, the Centre for Ethnic and Migration Studies (CEDEM) and the University of Liège organized their second scientific thematic workshop of the work package 2 on citizenship and political participation.

The workshop, “Multicultural Policies in Federated Entities,” started with an introductory speech given by Marco MARTINIELLO, director of the CEDEM. For those outside of the network he reviewed the INTEGRIM network objectives and highlighted the purposes of the meeting.

The first goal of the workshop was to address the links between citizenship and multiculturalism from a particular perspective but looking at the policy dimension. It also examined and compared policies designed and implemented to manage immigration related cultural diversity in a sample of federated entities of several European and non-European federal countries. The contributions focused on three main issues: Language diversity, religious diversity and artistic diversity. The second goal of the workshop was to give INTEGRIM Early Stage Researchers the opportunity to discuss the papers of senior researchers on the one hand, and on the second hand, to present their dissertation project and its advancements.

 

The program was therefore organized as follows: a morning session chaired by the director of CEDEM, Marco MARTINIELLO, with several presentations of senior researchers followed by an afternoon session, chaired by Sonia GSIR (CEDEM) to finish the presentations on different European and non-European federal countries. The program concluded with a special PhD student session.

Presentations

  •  Lesleyanne HAWTHORNE from the University of Melbourne made a presentation via Skype on Multiculturalism in Australia – Strategic Approaches to Managing Linguistic, Religious and Artistic Diversity.  She explained the evolution of immigration and multicultural policies in Australia and the current debates and focused her presentation on 3 strategies: managing linguistic, religious and artistic diversity. She received comments and questions from Shannon DAMERY (CEDEM, INTEGRIM ESR).
  • Gianni D’AMATO from the University of Neuchatel presented the immigration history of Switzerland and the differences in managing diversity at the cantons level in a presentation entitled A Multicultural Country without Multicultural Policies? The case of Switzerland. His speech was followed by a discussion from Jean-Michel LAFLEUR (CEDEM).
  • From the Expert Council of German Foundations on Migration and Integration, Caroline SCHULTZ presented how Germany has dealt with cultural diversity.  She focused on two Länder in particular (Bavaria and Berlin) and highlighted the differences in their approaches despite the fact that they are located in the same country. The title of her presentation was Managing Cultural Diversity in Federal Germany: Bavaria and Berlin as Classic Antagonists?  Costica DUMBRAVA from the University of Maastricht opened the debates with his comments and questions.
  • In her presentation, Managing Cultural Diversities in Spain: The Effects of Transnational Migration on Regional Cultural Policies, Monica IBAÑEZ (University of Burgos) focused on diversity from “within” and diversity from “without.” She discussed Spain’s many regional identities that already struggle with, or against, cohesion and how this matter becomes more complex when also considering diversity created by migration. Her presentation was followed by a discussion and questions from Anastasia BERMUDEZ (CEDEM).
  • Victor ARMONY from the UQAM (Montreal) presented his paper on Diverging Policy Approaches to Diversity in Canada: Québec and English Canada. He showed in particular how the province of Québec has specificities when dealing with diversity. The INTEGRIM ESR Tina MAGAZZINI (University of Deusto) discussed his presentation.

Two participants scheduled in the afternoon session could not present their papers. Katya LONG (Université Libre de Bruxelles) intended to present her paper, A State-Level Analysis of Integration Policy in the United States: California and Texas. The Skype connection could not be established due to local technical problems in Tunisia where she currently resides. Corinne TORREKENS (Université Libre de Bruxelles) Between Assimilation and Multiculturalism: Realities and Practices of Integration Policies towards Language, Religious and Artistic Diversity in Belgium, cancelled her participation at the last minute due to medical reasons.

PhD sessions:

This workshop also afforded and opportunity for newly recruited INTEGRIM PhD researchers to participate in a network activity. Stefano PIEMONTESE (recruited by the CEU) attended the workshop and participated actively in the discussions. Cristina-Claudia PARASCHIVESCU, currently at the University of Leeds, will spend one year in CEDEM starting in September and she presented her current research (see below).

  • Shannon DAMERY, CEDEM,  ‘Going Home.’ The reality of imagined connections among young migrants in Belgium
  • Agnese LACE, MireKoç, Koç University: Shared Citizenship across stronger borders: state justifications for application of dual citizenship
  • Cristina-Claudia PARASCHIVESCU, University of Leeds: Transnationalism as the negotiation of belonging. A case-study of Romanians in London and Paris
  • Tina MAGAZZINI: ‘Identifying identity’ in the European National Roma Integration Strategies

 

As all PhD student papers circulated before the workshop, and also because they were required to adhere to a ten minute time limit, the discussions following each presentation were quite rich and fruitful.